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  • Cat Rocketship Love is Love 5" x 7" Print

Love is Love 5" x 7" Print

$15.00
Excl. tax

"And love is love is love is love is love is love is love is love, cannot be killed or swept aside."

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This bright, unframed 5x7 print carries the details of the original watercolor and ink.
  • Handmade
  • Height: 7 inches
  • Width: 5 inches

Using the words of Lin-Manuel Marinda's poem delivered at the Tony Awards just after the Orlando Pride shooting in June 2016:

"My wife’s the reason anything gets done.
She nudges me towards promise by degrees.
She is a perfect symphony of one.
Our son is her most beautiful reprise.
We chase the melodies that seem to find us
Until they’re finished songs and start to play.
When senseless acts of tragedy remind us
That nothing here is promised, not one day
This show is proof that history remembers
We live through times when hate and fear seem stronger
We rise and fall and light from dying embers,
Remembrances that hope and love last longer.
And love is love is love is love is love is love is love is love, cannot be killed or swept aside.
I sing Vanessa’s symphony, Eliza tells her story.
Now fill the world with music, love, and pride."

Maker, Cat Rocketship, made this because she needed it. She was happy to find other people found this print is something they need, too.

The ACLU's stated mission is "to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States." When the ACLU was founded in 1920, its focus was on freedom of speech, primarily for anti-war protesters. During the 1920s, the ACLU expanded its scope to include protecting the free speech rights of artists and striking workers, and working with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to decrease racism and discrimination. During the 1930s, the ACLU started to engage in work combating police misconduct and for Native American rights. Most of the ACLU's cases came from the Communist party and Jehovah's Witnesses. In 1940, the ACLU leadership was caught up in the Red Scare, and voted to exclude Communists from its leadership positions. During World War II, the ACLU defended Japanese-American citizens, unsuccessfully trying to prevent their forcible relocation to internment camps. During the Cold War, the ACLU headquarters was dominated by anti-Communists, but many local affiliates defended members of the Communist Party.

Now, the ACLU is instrumental in continuing the fight for rights of lesbian, gay, transgender, bisexual, and queer people, people of color, women, non-Christians, Christians, men, workers, artists, and more.

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