Celebrate Black History Month!

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Celebrate Black History Month!

Celebrate Black History Month

 

February is Black History Month and while more events are virtual in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there are plenty of ways to celebrate Black culture throughout the month in Indianapolis and around the country. In fact, there are so many virtual opportunities to participate in the celebration of Black culture, we had a hard time narrowing down the choices. 

 

  • Support Black businesses  
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  • Art & Soul:  Throughout February, the Arts Council of Indianapolis will host a series of free performances that can be viewed online at 12:15 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. Art & Soul is in its 25th year, and its 2021 celebration will be highlighted by four featured artists — Christopher Pitts, AshLee Baskin, Matthew Cooper and Yadin Kol. People can take advantage of dining deals at two Indianapolis restaurants, Pa & Ma's Backyard BBQ and Chef Oya's The Trap, for dine-in or takeout throughout February. Click here for the date and times with descriptions of performances. 
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  • Take Virtual Field Trips:  With many museums shuttered due to Covid, Black History museums across the US are unable to welcome guests or program as in years past, pushing many galleries to go digital. Without having to stand in line or scramble for tickets, Black art connoisseurs can visit galleries from home. Using 360 street view technology, Google Arts and Culture allows for gallery goers to take a virtual field trip and enjoy online experiences through more than 80 partner institutions. Among the featured exhibits are the Civil Rights Movement Exhibit; Fredrick Douglass—from Slavery to Freedom: The Journey to New York, and Kansas City Jazz. Google Arts and Culture also offers African American Art from the Hewitt Collection
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  • Donate to Black organizations 
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  • Visit the Levi and Catharine Coffin House:  The Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites operate the Levi and Catharine Coffin House, which served as a stop on the Underground Railroad in Fountain City. The Coffins helped slaves make their way from the South through Indiana to Canada and other free states in the North. You can take a guided tour of the home and hear stories of people who journeyed for freedom. Due to the pandemic, face masks are required at the site and tour groups are limited to 10 people at a time at either 10:30 a.m. or 1:30 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday.
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  • Discover Black Artists:  The Indianapolis Public Library's Central branch will showcase the works of prominent local Black artists though March 27. The library hopes to eventually have the works on display for in-person viewing, but several virtual events will be held throughout February, including the annual fashion show on Feb. 26. Click here for event dates and times. 
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  • Participate in Online Events:  Throughout the month of February, the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is launching virtual events and conversations that affirm and preserve the accomplishments of African Americans throughout history. Events are free and open to all -- but registration is required.
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  • Have a Black film marathon utilizing the wide selections of films on streaming services.
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  • Read books by Black authors  
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  • Educate Yourself about Black history and experiences:  Western Michigan University’s Black Student Union is leading a Zoom series every Monday at 7 p.m. Topics include the Women’s Liberation Movement, The Great Migration and mass incarceration and how those events shaped the Black family structure. Those interested will have to register for the event through a Google form.
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  • Call out racism and prejudice in your community while engaging in healthy conversations about Black history on social media
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  • Listen to Black Voices:  “Who I Am,” a celebration of African American Heritage, is a free Theatre West production on YouTube that features seven actor-writers sharing their personal stories and life lessons from parents and grandparents, and “what it means to be Black in America in the face of 2020’s call to action.” theatrewest.org 
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  • Support the Black media, black press and the NNPA 
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  • Read Dr. King’s I Have a Dream Speech
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  • Register to vote!

 

Let us know what else we can add!

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